Tag Archive | Random acts of kindness

Week 28: Head-up a donation drive!

As we look at the little things we can do everyday to make a difference it is also important to look at the bigger picture, too!

Random acts of kindness usually just affect one person. You leave a positive note on someone’s car or a little present for someone inside the library. All powerful and positive ways to make a different in someone’s day, but what if your one act of kindness could reach more people?

Have you ever tried running a donations drive? By you, starting the one random act of kindness to get the drive started, you are able to affect many people. This drive could be for food, clothes, shoes, blankets, anything really! Start it at work or at school. Put out boxes. Tape up flyers announcing how long the drive will be running. Send emails to those working in our office or that go to your school. Let your local neighborhood or city know you have this drive set-up for those in your area to participate.  Send out reminders and watch the donations pour in! With a donation bigger than you could have done alone, not only are you able to help more people, but you have also given others the opportunity to make a difference, too!

Happy donation drive running!

Week 27: Take two steps out of your comfort zone

Random acts of kindness can reach all groups of people. You are able to affect those closest to you, friends and family, people you may never meet or see affected by this, or even people who may never be able to return the favor. In week 27, we are going to focus on helping those with kindness who are not able to help you.

The homeless are often those who are overlooked and could really benefit from your random acts of kindness. Really step out of your comfort zone and interact with them. This interaction could be as simple as a “Good morning” as you walk by them on your way to work, or if you are standing with them at a bus stop, ask them how they are doing. Something as simple as a conversion says you know they are not invisible. You might be surprised by the stories they share!

I tend not to give money to those in need that ask for money on the street corner. You never know what that money could be used for and it might not be helping them at all. There are some people who are not as truthful about their situation as it appears. A friend of mine sat down and had a long conversation with one of her local homeless resident and it turned out he wasn’t homeless at all, but takes the role of it and people give him money. It’s ironic because people give the homeless money to feel good about themselves, never questioning what giving them money will really do. If you are going to give money, find your local homeless shelter or soup kitchen to donate to. In my opinion, the people who frequent these places are attempting to turn their lives around and the organizations need your help to help others who really need help.

Personally, if there is someone outside of a grocery store and I am heading in, I’ll come out with an extra sandwich for them. Then at least I know they won’t be hungry and I have done what I can, knowing my money has gone to a good and positive resource. I once talked to someone who gives out chocolate bars instead of cash. She has her car stocked. I love this idea.

Don’t feel like you can help? Are you getting coffee this morning? Then you have the ability to get a coffee or a sandwich for the person standing outside who doesn’t have the means to buy their own.

Help someone who may never be able to return the favor to you, but know what goes around, comes around in some way or another.

Week 26: Manners

In this week we are looking at how we can initiate random acts of kindness just by refocusing on our everyday manners. It’s time to take what your mama taught you and put it into action!

Here are 5 ways to make a difference in someone’s day just from your good manners:

  1. Hold the door open for someone. There is nothing more frustrating than having the door slammed in your face and your spirits are always uplifted when someone thinks of you, too, and gives you an easy entrance.
  2. Smile! They’re contagious!
  3. Give someone your seat on the bus. See someone with their kid or kids? An older person with tired legs? Or just someone who needs a break in their day? Offer your seat to them to help them out.
  4. Let someone in line in front of you. Do you have a lot of groceries and the person behind you only has two? Let them go first and help them get on their way.
  5. Say hello. Let the people you run into know that their existence matters with a simple hello.

Week 25: Start the chain

These next four weeks may just be my favorite four weeks of the whole year to write about. That’s because for the next four weeks we will be having a theme of RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS! There is nothing better than that feeling when you do something nice for someone who can’t repay you. It’s like being a secret happiness agent. This theme incorporates all of my hopes and dreams for this 52 Weeks of Good campaign. Looking at the little things we can do every day to make a difference and random acts of kindness are pieces we can easily incorporate into our lives everyday!

“If we all do one random act of kindness daily we just might set the world in the right direction.”

For week 25 we will explore the idea of starting a random acts of kindness chain effect, starting with you! This is where you can take public opportunities to do something nice for someone and hope that they start the trend.

Here are 5 great ideas to get you started!

  1. Buy coffee for the person in line behind you. If no one is there, give the barista $5 to pay for the person after you.
  2. Talk with a homeless person. So many people walk past them and don’t even give them the time of day. It doesn’t have to be a long conversation, just a simple hi, a smile and how is your day going? If you have a snack, share it with them. You will make their day better and hopefully inspire those who pass by to do the same.
  3. Give a stranger a compliment. It is always so unexpected and makes them feel great. With their brightened mood they will be sure to pass on their new found happiness.
  4. Leave a note on someone’s car (looking like a ticket under their wind shield wiper), but write a really positive comment on the paper. Wish them a good day and encouraging them to pass it along to spread the joy.
  5. Leave $20 with the cashier (at a grocery store, or a second hand clothing or furniture store) and ask them to use it on whomever they think could use the extra help. This gives the store clerk a chance to be part of the good. You might not only be making the receiver of the money’s day, but could be helping them with their months worth of groceries or new clothes for their kids.

I will leave you with this little video on a different perspective of security cameras:

What are your ideas for starting the kindness chain effect?

Random Acts of Kindness Weekend

Last weekend was a weekend full of random acts of kindness. It was a weekend that left me with a lot of hope and a large drive to pay it forward.

My boyfriend’s parents were in town and on Saturday we decided to go to the Mariner’s baseball game. We didn’t have tickets or expectations, it was just a nice day in Seattle and it would be a nice thing to do outside. We had lunch outside and arrived to the game a little late (which was ok because the Mariner’s were loosing, no surprise there). We drove around for a little bit trying to find a cheap parking lot, but they were all $20 or more! We drove down a back street and as we started to approach, someone pulled out of a spot that was in the shade! And not only that, it was a free sport, which is pretty much unheard of down by the stadium. Perfect.

We started walking to the stadium to buy our cheap nose bleed section tickets out in the back field bleachers when a car drove past. Stopped a few feet back. Rolled down the window and shouted back at us, “Are you going to the game?” We acknowledged with a “Yes” half expecting them to say that it wasn’t worth it because they were loosing so badly, but to our surprise they replied, “Do you have tickets?” “No,” we said, “we were just about to go to the booth to get some.” “Here you go,” the woman replied, passing us four unused tickets. We thanked them about 100 times. I tried my best to think if I had anything in my purse I could give them to say thank you. A chocolate? A pack of gum? No, that would be weird. A gift card? Nothing. They drove away, all of us were full of smiles and the four of us danced our way to the game singing about our great luck and fortune.


The game was quick and fairly uneventful. Well, for the Mariner’s that is. The White Sox, Philip Humber, pitched a shutout, making him the 21st person to throw a perfect game. Now, if you think of all the major league baseball games, throughout all of the years baseball has existed, between all of the team, that is pretty amazing that he is the 21st. And we were there to see history. Amazing.

The sun was out. The skies were blue and we were happy.

With so much good fortune all I could think about was paying it forward. All of these great things happened to us, so now it was our turn to pass along the good to others that crossed our paths. So, that is exactly what we did and continue to do. This Mariner’s Saturday reminds that everyday is an opportunity to pay it forward and make someone else’s day as bright as that other family made ours.

What have you done to pay it forward today?